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Eyck is also known for including many fictional entities into his work such as grisaille statuettes to imitate real sculpture and reflections on mirrors that seem to reflect the unknown.

Jan van Eyck(3)

playskool-estonia.com Jan is the most famous member of a family of painters whose work is epitomized in the Ghent Altarpiece that brought unrivaled realism to the figures and themes of medieval art. His uncanny ability to manipulate the properties of the oil medium was subject of awe by many of his co-painters. His fame was given rise to by the fact that he was able to produce paintings that expressed unrivalled skills in pictorial illusionism. One of his works gThe Crucifixionh, whose landscape featured cracked rocky earth, fleeting formations of clouds and the diminution of seemingly endless detail towards the blue horizon reflected his exquisite knowledge of the natural world and how things work scientifically.
From the fifteenth century onwards, many artists and admirers of his work had expressed their awe in his ability to mimic reality paying much attention to the effect of light on different surfaces. From dull reflections on opaque surfaces to luminous, shifting highlights on metal or glass. This is very evident on his work on gThe Virgin of Canon van der Paeleh that he produced in 1436, wherein glinting gold thread of the brocaded cape of Saint Donatian, the glow of rounded pearls and the dazzle of faceted jewels in the wardrobe of holy figures or the seemingly distorted reflections of the figures of the Virgin and Child on each of the many folds on Saint Georgefs helmet, all combined produced a unique captivating effect that made his work unrivalled and subject of envy by most. His ability to produce a seemingly organized and orderly form from otherwise distorted images has made his work stand out from the rest of the works from the same era.
Jan is also known for including many fictional entities into his work such as grisaille statuettes to imitate real sculpture and reflections on mirrors that seem to reflect the unknown. One of his works, gThe Amolfini Portraith has a convex mirror on the rear wall that has the reflection of two individuals entering the room. One of the utterly ghostly images is said to be Van Eyck himself, made evident by his signature above the figure that reads gJan van Eyck has been here 1434h.