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Fragonard's name was forged with those two characteristics that he made acceptable with the tender beauty of his facile brushwork and use of color.

Jean-Honor Fragonard(4)

playskool-estonia.com Jean-Honor Fragonard was not a pupil of the academy, but he gained the Prix de Rome in 1752 when he produced a painting of gJerboam Sacrificing to the Golden Calfh. Before proceeding to Rome he studied for three more years under Charles-Andre van Loo. A year before he left for Rome he painted the gChrist Washing the Feet of the Apostlesh which is now in the Grasse Cathedral. He took position at the French Academy in Rome, which was presided on at the time by Charles-Joseph Natoire.
When he was in Rome, he met Hubert Robert with whom he toured Italy with and made numerous sketches of scenery that was to be the basis for the backgrounds of his succeeding works. He used the garden scenery along with their romantic hues to create his own unique art. The flowing fountains sheltered below scenery of woods and various fields of flowers. The lush gardens with their well laid-out flowers and shrubbery coupled with natures little creatures. He was able to create the ideal settings for his portraits that is going to be his source of income for many years to come. He admired the works of Dutch and Flemish Masters from schools where he learned to imitate their vigorous but loose brush strokes. He added to his own vision to that of Giovanni Battista Tiepolo whose florid sumptuousness he studied in Venice before he went back to Paris in1761.
A work of his gCoresus and Callirhoeh secured him admission to the Academy of Art which resulted in a pompous eulogy by Diderot. The said work was purchased by the king who had the work copied at the Gobelins Factory. From there on Fragonard switched between religious, classical and other subjects which was overcome by the demand for Louie XVfs wealthy art patrons for artwork that showcased scenery of love and voluptuousness. His name was forged with those two characteristics that he made acceptable with the tender beauty of his facile brushwork and use of color. Some of his works end up as decorations for the apartments of Madame du Barry and the dancer Madeline Guimard.